5 Tips for Healthy Living While Over the Road

Spending 11 hours behind the wheel of a truck doesn’t leave much time to create the perfect healthy lifestyle, but there are some great small steps you can take that will make a huge difference in the long run while going over the road.

Here are our top five tips:

  1. Avoid truck stop food. This is a double whammy, the food is usually high in sodium and fat and you’re spending money that you could be saving!
  2. Don’t wear sweatpants! Truck driving means long hours in a sitting position. It can be very tempting, but before you know it that extra weight is there and you can no longer fit into your jeans.
  3. Buy a cooler and bring your own food. Packing food and eating healthy doesn’t have to be complicated. Start your morning with a protein shake or a whole grain bagel with peanut butter. Eat fruit or choose a trail mix with instead of a bag of chips for snacking. Choosing lean meats like chicken and turkey for sandwiches are just another way to stay healthy and this can also help with your energy level.
  4. Always take every opportunity to get out of the truck to walk/power walk/jog a few laps and STRETCH, holding it for 15-30 seconds and release it slowly.
  5. Laugh! Laughter is known for stress relief and who doesn’t enjoy that belly ache from a good laugh? Laughter is known to relax the body and boost our immune system.

For more great tips on exercises, food ideas, and saving money, check out www.healthytrucker.net and drive safe!

How to Fight Fatigue While Driving Over the Road

Fatigue is dangerous for every driver, but can be fatal for truck drivers. Exhaustion slows down your reactions and can often impair your judgment without you even knowing. We have heard our graduates tell us some interesting tricks to staying awake such as putting rocks in your shoes so the uncomfortable feeling keeps you up, or having a cold rag to put on your face to shock you awake. Some common signs of fatigue are:

-          Tiredness or sleepiness
-          Irritability
-          Loss of appetite
-          Digestive problems
-          Increased susceptibility to illness

To avoid fatigue and stay alert:

-          Drink water instead of coffee
-          Exercise regularly, even if it’s a 20 minute brisk walk
-          Maintain a healthy diet; choose foods rich in fiber and antioxidants (sugar is tempting for the spike in energy, but you’ll just crash harder later)
-          Do not multi-task while driving, keep your eyes on the road!
-          Listen to your body, it knows when it’s tired and needs rest

These may work temporarily, but in the end it is rest, diet and exercise that are the best things for your body, in and out of the truck. Take care of your body and you’ll be less stressed, more alert and feeling great. You’ll be able to tackle any challenge the road throws at you. Check out www.cdllife.com/health for great tips for trucker specific exercise, meal ideas and support.

Oil and Energy Rep coming to Twentynine Palms

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Helping People Start Their New Career

This past May, California Career School hosted a career resource fair at our Anaheim location. It was filled with several vendors who presented information about their need for more employees. All of the vendors had contacted us in search of someone to hire from our school. There were also other resources available such as financial planning or different funding available. Some of our Twentynine Palms and Oceanside students came to receive information from their areas of interest and joined in the fun. One of them was selected in a raffle and won a USMC jersey.

Donnavin, the Instructor Supervisor, stood at our booth for all of those that came from surrounding cities. People were also able to sit in on presentations from companies and learn about what they offer. Some of our current students were offered jobs on the spot, while other people were told if they attended our program that they would be qualified to work at their company.

CCS is always trying to help the community and show people that there are many opportunities out there, and with just a little bit of training, you too, can start your career.

 

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CCS Career Resource Fair

Mark your calendars for this fantastic opportunity! CCS is hosting a career and resource fair this Thursday right here in Anaheim.  If you need a job or are looking to secure your future, THIS is where you need to be. There will be employers seeking quality employees and offering them an opportunity to meet with our students along with friends, family, and those looking to join the industry. There will be interviews administered by employers along with conditional pre employment offers. This is a great opportunity to meet with many companies at one time and select those you may want to work for. We will see you there!

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How to Comply with the Hours-of-Service Regulations

What they are? The hours-of-service regulations were set in place to provide safety to all drivers. They regulate when and how long you may drive so to reduce driver fatigue. The hours-of-service regulations are found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations.

What are the limits? Specific limits are placed on the amount of time you may drive your truck and how many total hours you can work before you are no longer permitted to drive a commercial motor vehicle.
There is a 14 hour “driving window” limit and an 11 hour “driving limit”.

14 Hour Driving Window
This is the daily limit where you can drive up to 11 hours; the remaining hours may be used to fill up gas, inspection, waiting at a terminal, etc. A person will not be allowed to drive again until they have been off duty for at least 10 consecutive hours.
*Commonly known as 11-14-10*

11 Hour Driving Limit
You are only allowed to drive your truck up to the 11 total hours as stated above. Since June 30, 2013, driving is not permitted if more than 8 hours have passed since the end of the driver’s last off-duty. A 30-minute break is mandatory for all drivers if they have driven 8 consecutive hours.

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On-Duty vs. Off-Duty
Time spent On-Duty is part of your 14 hour limit of daily working hours. Any time you are working for a motor carrier whether paid or not is considered on-duty. Time spent at a plant, terminal, or facility is considered on-duty, along with loading or unloading. Any pre or post-trip inspections are on duty as well.

Off-duty time is when you are relieved of all duty and responsibility for performing work. When you can walk away from your truck and leave it where it is parked to experience any fun activities that you choose to do; such as sightseeing, exercise, etc.

Penalties for Violating
Minimum penalties would include putting a person out of service until they have met the requirements. A log book examination would be performed, resulting in a $1500 minimum fine, but can range in price depending on if there have been multiple violations. It will go on your permanent record with the DOT for 3 years and can be viewed by perspective employers and other government agencies. Also a person can be terminated if violations continue.

Student describes his experience at CCS

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Eugene Cannida came to California Career School today after he  received his Commercial Drivers license three days prior. He states that we are not just a school but a family and he wanted to see everyone again. CCS has placed over 300 graduates in the oil fields and Eugene has been working with a few companies to eventually move to North Dakota.

North Dakota has recorded the highest personal income growth among all states for the sixth time in the last seven years. Statistics released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis indicated that the state’s personal income grew 7.6 percent in 2013; this is mainly due to energy developmentMany oil companies are in need of people with a CDL and Eugene knew that he would have a better chance getting hired if he received one.

Schneider comes to visit CCS

Kim, one of the field reps for Schneider, came by and spoke to our students here at our Anaheim location. Meeting with a recruiter can give students valuable inside knowledge about the industry and the reality of starting out. She discussed the training program, the pay, and other extra benefits that the company provides. Two of our current students that attended the meeting enjoyed Schneider and felt that they had great things to offer. Our military guys loved that they have a program to use their GI Bill.

The students that went to the recruiter meeting felt as if the training was better than most companies because the trainee drives and the trainer is always with them, not sleeping but training. Most companies will have the trainer and trainee split the drive time, or basically team drive, which they felt did not allow the learner to improve to their full potential. This portion only lasts between 2-3 weeks and the trainer will then discuss what the trainee needs more work in, such as: more time driving in traffic, practice backing up, etc.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, In May 2012, the most occupational employment with heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers is in these top 5 states:
Texas: 144,900
California: 122,660
Pennsylvania: 70,980
Florida: 65,410
Ohio: 65,340

BLS also states that, “employment for truck drivers is projected to grow 21% from 2010 to 2020, this is faster than the average for all occupations. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving”.

It is never too late to start a new career path and get your CDL, and with great companies always looking to recruit and expand, it has never been easier.

Albert Follows in his Fathers Footsteps

Albert Sais graduated with his commercial truck driver’s license, proudly sharing with us, “My father was a truck driver.”

The skills yard training was tough. He said, “The clutch would give me trouble along with the parallel parking, but I just listened to [my instructor] and got it down.”

He said that his current plans are to “possibly start for a company that I got a pre-hire from, if not, apply at some jobs back home and put my CDL skills to work.” At this time, he is working with the placement department to see his options.

We asked him what surprised him the most. Albert answered, “The knowledge the instructor has. I was nervous about taking the course and when I saw [my instructor's] teaching skills and ability to teach anyone, I knew I could do it. [...] You get all endorsements, great teaching, flexible, and a smart choice.”

“I just wanted to have something else on my background and to also show my Dad I can do it.”

3 Recruiter Presentations next week!

EMPLOYER PRESENTATION - MarchWe will be having 3 different trucking companies come to our Anaheim school next week! Even if you do not have your CDL yet, feel free to come by and get informaion on what each company has to offer. You always want to do your research before starting a new career. Afterwards we can get you set up to meet with our admissions representative!

All of the recruiters are awesome and have different aspects of the trucking industry. Some are previous drivers, others work in the safety field.. So come to one or come to all!