Schneider comes to visit CCS

Kim, one of the field reps for Schneider, came by and spoke to our students here at our Anaheim location. Meeting with a recruiter can give students valuable inside knowledge about the industry and the reality of starting out. She discussed the training program, the pay, and other extra benefits that the company provides. Two of our current students that attended the meeting enjoyed Schneider and felt that they had great things to offer. Our military guys loved that they have a program to use their GI Bill.

The students that went to the recruiter meeting felt as if the training was better than most companies because the trainee drives and the trainer is always with them, not sleeping but training. Most companies will have the trainer and trainee split the drive time, or basically team drive, which they felt did not allow the learner to improve to their full potential. This portion only lasts between 2-3 weeks and the trainer will then discuss what the trainee needs more work in, such as: more time driving in traffic, practice backing up, etc.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, In May 2012, the most occupational employment with heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers is in these top 5 states:
Texas: 144,900
California: 122,660
Pennsylvania: 70,980
Florida: 65,410
Ohio: 65,340

BLS also states that, “employment for truck drivers is projected to grow 21% from 2010 to 2020, this is faster than the average for all occupations. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving”.

It is never too late to start a new career path and get your CDL, and with great companies always looking to recruit and expand, it has never been easier.

Marine Graduates Assist after 3 Car Pileup

On their way back from work , Marines and CCS graduates Mike Muniz, Robert Puga, Dewayne Creary, Marcus Pepper, Thomas Morey, and Scott Reid stopped to help at a three car pileup on the I40 in Oklahoma City.

Our contact at IPS, called us about the incident to let us know that our graduates had stopped to help. “We were just driving,” said Robert Puga, “we had just gotten off work.” It was in the middle of the day and their van was literally the first vehicle on scene, “Just shy of running over that guy,” Robert described. Driver Scott Reid exercised spot-on threshold braking to make sure they avoided the ejected driver. A Dodge truck with a gooseneck had hit a van, flipping it over as the truck also collided with another passenger car.

Robert told us that the van’s driver didn’t seem to have a seatbelt on and launched out of the rear window. “He was non-responsive… his arm was pretty mangled. There was blood.”

All seven Marines busily helped the injured, six of which graduated from our Twentynine Palms and Camp Pendleton schools. “I started helping Michael out… he was already pulling her out,” Robert referred to the woman stuck inside of the overturned van. “Everybody did something, it was just second nature.”

Michael Muniz updated his Facebook that day with this message: “On our [way] back to the hotel from work this afternoon and right in front of us was a 3 car rear end, the van in front of us, the driver was ejected out of the back window, We were in a 15 passenger van and the guy driving our van came 6 feet from running the guy over, he had to slam on the brakes. All 7 us (All former Marines) got out and helped everyone out, it gave me flash backs from deployments being on QRF. Counting my blessings today.”

 

Albert Follows in his Fathers Footsteps

Albert Sais graduated with his commercial truck driver’s license, proudly sharing with us, “My father was a truck driver.”

The skills yard training was tough. He said, “The clutch would give me trouble along with the parallel parking, but I just listened to [my instructor] and got it down.”

He said that his current plans are to “possibly start for a company that I got a pre-hire from, if not, apply at some jobs back home and put my CDL skills to work.” At this time, he is working with the placement department to see his options.

We asked him what surprised him the most. Albert answered, “The knowledge the instructor has. I was nervous about taking the course and when I saw [my instructor's] teaching skills and ability to teach anyone, I knew I could do it. [...] You get all endorsements, great teaching, flexible, and a smart choice.”

“I just wanted to have something else on my background and to also show my Dad I can do it.”

Student to the Rescue!

During training, a coolant filter ruptured on one our vehicles leaving our students and instructor in the Barstow desert. We called our regular towing and repair company and they said, “[We] can’t get one till the next day.”

“We’re out in the desert,” and, “running out of options.” To top it all off, it was a hot day in July. “I would have had to gotten a tow,” said Pat. So he decided to call recent graduate and soldier Levi Busch. “He just lived five minutes away from where we broke down.”

“I got a call from Pat,” said Levi, “They were stranded by Yermo… grabbed my tools and went out.” Levi drove Pat down to a store on the other side of town and found the filter in question. Levi had the right set of tools and the problem was taken care of in a quick minute. “It’s no problem, I wanted to get the truck working… It’s taking time from the students too.” In a nutshell, he said, “Anytime for Pat!” The vehicle was back in running order and students went on to train with Pat once again.

Pat told us that Levi received the highest DMV score among his classmates during his testing day. We want to share our appreciation with Levi for coming out to help us when our students and our instructor were running out of options. Once again, thanks Levi!

Homeland Security Grad

Walter David Hinds, athlete and hunter, came to California Career School back in October last year. He has a son in Afghanistan and is a graduate of various weapons and training schools.

We asked him, why choose a vocational school? “Honestly,” David expressed, “I needed the permits.” He talked about his weapons training, being an edge weapon instructor, avidly participating in jujitsu and all kinds of other activities. Yet, application after application, employers would press him, “Where’s your permit for pepperspray?” or “Where’s your permit for baton training?” Some employers told him that his concealed carry weapons permit was not valid for the job—that he needed a regular firearms carry permit. That’s how David Hinds stopped by our front door here at California Career School. He earned his firearms permit, pepperspray training permit, baton permit, first aid/CPR permit, and finally his guard card.

“Right now, I’m headed to the gym,” he joked. “Right now, I’m focusing on one job,” David referred to Social Security or any Veteran’s building. “I’ll apply to other different places. I’m a protective agent,” he explained, “that’s what I enjoy.”

So we went on to talk about firearms. He described to me a situation some time ago when he was approached by some individuals out in Moreno Valley and was shot twice in the chest during a robbery. “There’s dangers, so you have to be careful. Good things happen from [guns]—bad things happen from [guns].” When the robbery occurred, he thought, “I didn’t really think anything would ever happen to me.” David expressed that, no matter how prepared you feel to be, there are always threats.

Fast forward to today, after his completion of the Homeland Security and Investigations Course. He talked about the importance of keeping face as a security officer and to use the mind before resorting to force. He said, “Always got to keep sharp. You have to balance it out. You don’t want to be hurting someone for no reason.” Over the course of training, Roland, our course instructor, helped David refine a number of things, one being trigger reset while handling firearms. Another more personal type of focus was David’s left eye dominance, which he had previously been unaware of. Adjustments in firearm grip and technique needed to be made because of this.

“I knew where my strengths and weaknesses [were],” he described. “Roland helped turn my weaknesses into strengths… There’s always room for improvement. I definitely feel improved.”

OTR to Local in 3 Months

After returning from 3 months of the mentor program with a trucking carrier, Vanessa Abdin landed another job locally! “I just enjoyed the driving!” she explained to us. Over the duration of her time, she saw Georgia, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and all over the Midwest. “I finally got to see all over my home state!” Vanessa is from Texas. The most beautiful thing she saw was the Rocky Mountains, she described to us. “It’s a whole new world!”

abdin“This will probably crack Ken up but me mentor said I was a natural at backing up!” Vanessa mentioned what her mentor said about her driving.

Now she’s working for school services driving a bus locally to help disabled children. She feels like she is really making a difference. She went on her own to obtain a passenger endorsement and picked up the job recently. On top of that requirement, her class A license made her competitive among the rest of the applicants. It is also getting her higher wages than those without the class A license at her company. “Having a clean record really helps,” added Vanessa. “I feel so good about this bus driving.”

She told her CCS instructor, “you’d be so proud of me, I can drive anything now!” He told me, “You’ll never forget what you experienced out there.”

“I’d do it again, thank you,” she replied.

Student Transfer

Lidia T. graduated with her commercial truck driver’s license, and proudly shared with us that she is, “excited to get to work”!

Lidia did not start her training here at CCS, but transferred here. Luckily the Agency she was funded by, allowed her to transfer to our program at no cost to her.

LidiaTLidia had a better experience here, and received the training that she needed. Lidia said that our instructors here are “nice, and patience can really help people learn better.” Coming here Lidia was able to train on full size equipment which made it easier for her to be employable. She also had better hands on training, doing her entire training on the truck and not in a classroom. Lidia worked with our Placement Department and discussed a selection of companies that would fit her needs best. Truck driving is an adventure and she is prepared now and will find her way as she goes.

Lidia shared with us a story that she used to tell her kids when they were younger, “Princess Diana had the heart to hug sick people even though she was beautiful and wealthy. We all try to run away from people that are ill or ugly, but we are all special”. Lidia knows that she is going to face difficulties in a “man’s world” but says that “we all deserve respect” and she will not allow others to walk over her.

Lidia said, “I would recommend CCS to anyone! Just the other day, I encouraged someone to come here while sitting at the agency”. Thanks Lidia and congratulations on all your hard work! We wish you all the success.

Refer-a-Friend

refer-a-friend

 

We have had so many great success stories and we just want to keep them coming. Many people have started a new career path and gone to amazing companies and seen a lot of interesting places. Here at CCS we just want to say thank you for making our experience enjoyable. So now it is time to return thefavor. Earn extra income for helping a friend find a career.

 

Tell your friends about our program!

Spread the word; share with them your success story!

Earn referral rewards when you refer your friends to sign up!

 

Fall down 7, get up 8

 After getting his commercial class A license last week, Steve Fisher sat down and shared with us his difficulties and how they brought him to our doorstep.

“After I lost my job I was a little bit of a wreck. I was trying to think what I should do next and for the better part of 7 years I’ve always thought about getting my Class A license. So I decided to take the first step and look online for schools. CCS was the first one on the list. So I gave them a call and I talked to a gentlemen and he was very nice and gave me a rundown (over the phone) of the school. He told me about a program that went through Coastline Community College and that also had ties to One-Stop Center of Orange County. The program was designed to help people start a new trade and also find a new job. The gentleman told me that the program would help pay for the course. After talking to the gentleman, I went and looked at some other schools, two that were close to me and they were a little cheaper. But one school I would have had to go out to Riverside to train and CCS– they trained here in Anaheim.”

The key thing, he told us was, “I just wanted to be able to start a new, fresh start. I also was afraid that I wouldn’t be able to do or even finish the course. I’m glad that I proved myself wrong.”

“It was more than one light bulb that went off. Each step from the test that I had to study, the pre-trip, 5 point brake inspection, the alley dock, the parallel parking and learning to double clutch,” Steve added. “The difficulties and obstacles I faced were that I have a really bad memory and how did I overcome it? I just wouldn’t let myself quit. I just had to do this. To prove to myself I could do it!”

We asked him what was surprising or unexpected about his experienced. He said, “There was when we went to take the test at the DMV and to see all the different schools that were there and how bad their students were at doing the skills test. I was very lucky that my instructors showed me the right away and safe way to drive and park.”

“The school wouldn’t give up on me,” Steve told us. Right now, he concluded, “I’m looking forward to getting a new job. There are many different schools out there but if you want one of the best then CCS is the best choice.”

When One Door Closes, Many Open

Returning from a flight from Chicago, our Homeland Security and Investigations graduate, Kirk Wahrman decided to drop by and say hello. We had lost touch with him for a while since he was in the process of applying for a health and safety supervisory position on the other side of the US.
Before coming to California Career School, Mr. Wahrman was in the health and safety industry working happily and enjoying his duties. However, an unexpected discovery with his own health had forced him out of the job—he was diagnosed with cancer. After several months of testing and various visits to hospitals, he returned to his work place only to find that he was relieved of his position.

This devastating news forced him to turn to the Employment Development Department (EDD) for the next step. “They kept telling me,” Kirk recalled, “You have good experience but you don’t have a degree.” Having been in the industry for years, Kirk’s experience level was high but a school background was lacking. After more dead ends and little progress in his search, Kirk changed his focus and decided to look into the security field. From 1975 to about 1995, Mr. Wahrman served in the Navy . “I was in security many years ago. Getting back into the business, being post 9/11, I knew there were going to be many changes,” he expressed.

“And that’s how I found California Career School,” Kirk said. Various aspects of security needed to be looked at in very different ways than what had been done in the past. “Roland,” said Kirk, “was very supportive and flexible, very knowledgeable, very thorough, generally takes an interest in the students and wants to see them succeed.” Roland Esquivel is our course instructor for the Homeland Security and Investigations course.

We asked Kirk about his favorite part of the course. “Graduation day,” he exclaimed, “with all the food and festivities. No, I’m just teasing. But the sense of accomplishment was there, that I completed a huge 500 hours of training.”

“We studied a lot of real life security issues, things in the news, things that were current.” Students would read these articles and the class would break them down into what laws were applied in those given situations, what procedures were taken, correct and incorrect actions taken towards a suspect, and other types of observations. “It really helped me learn the right way to look at a situation and be a better security officer.”

“Once I finished California Career School, I was considered for higher than entry level positions.” His military background played a huge part in that. Since then, the California Career School placement office has helped Kirk obtain offers from Securitas and Allied Barton. Kirk worked for both of these companies but as of this writing, he will hopefully be returning to Chicago to pursue an opportunity that he recently found in the industry he was originally in: health and safety.

We hope that Kirk will make it into this job as it is the one that he was originally looking for before reaching out to California Career School. It is indeed in his own health and his own safety that we wish him well. We would like to thank Mr. Kirk Wahrman for repeatedly taking the time to come in to visit with big smiles and always something funny to share.

“He’s got a lot of talent—he was a great student,” said Roland, our instructor. “[He] had a lot of fun experiences to share with the class, made the class more interesting… he had a great sense of humor, he will do great at whatever he puts his mind to.”