Oil and Energy Rep coming to Twentynine Palms

IPS Flyer_CCS July 25th (3)

CCS Career Resource Fair

Mark your calendars for this fantastic opportunity! CCS is hosting a career and resource fair this Thursday right here in Anaheim.  If you need a job or are looking to secure your future, THIS is where you need to be. There will be employers seeking quality employees and offering them an opportunity to meet with our students along with friends, family, and those looking to join the industry. There will be interviews administered by employers along with conditional pre employment offers. This is a great opportunity to meet with many companies at one time and select those you may want to work for. We will see you there!

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How to Comply with the Hours-of-Service Regulations

What they are? The hours-of-service regulations were set in place to provide safety to all drivers. They regulate when and how long you may drive so to reduce driver fatigue. The hours-of-service regulations are found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations.

What are the limits? Specific limits are placed on the amount of time you may drive your truck and how many total hours you can work before you are no longer permitted to drive a commercial motor vehicle.
There is a 14 hour “driving window” limit and an 11 hour “driving limit”.

14 Hour Driving Window
This is the daily limit where you can drive up to 11 hours; the remaining hours may be used to fill up gas, inspection, waiting at a terminal, etc. A person will not be allowed to drive again until they have been off duty for at least 10 consecutive hours.
*Commonly known as 11-14-10*

11 Hour Driving Limit
You are only allowed to drive your truck up to the 11 total hours as stated above. Since June 30, 2013, driving is not permitted if more than 8 hours have passed since the end of the driver’s last off-duty. A 30-minute break is mandatory for all drivers if they have driven 8 consecutive hours.

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On-Duty vs. Off-Duty
Time spent On-Duty is part of your 14 hour limit of daily working hours. Any time you are working for a motor carrier whether paid or not is considered on-duty. Time spent at a plant, terminal, or facility is considered on-duty, along with loading or unloading. Any pre or post-trip inspections are on duty as well.

Off-duty time is when you are relieved of all duty and responsibility for performing work. When you can walk away from your truck and leave it where it is parked to experience any fun activities that you choose to do; such as sightseeing, exercise, etc.

Penalties for Violating
Minimum penalties would include putting a person out of service until they have met the requirements. A log book examination would be performed, resulting in a $1500 minimum fine, but can range in price depending on if there have been multiple violations. It will go on your permanent record with the DOT for 3 years and can be viewed by perspective employers and other government agencies. Also a person can be terminated if violations continue.

Student describes his experience at CCS

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Eugene Cannida came to California Career School today after he  received his Commercial Drivers license three days prior. He states that we are not just a school but a family and he wanted to see everyone again. CCS has placed over 300 graduates in the oil fields and Eugene has been working with a few companies to eventually move to North Dakota.

North Dakota has recorded the highest personal income growth among all states for the sixth time in the last seven years. Statistics released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis indicated that the state’s personal income grew 7.6 percent in 2013; this is mainly due to energy developmentMany oil companies are in need of people with a CDL and Eugene knew that he would have a better chance getting hired if he received one.

Passed BAR Audit

California Career School  was audited by the Bar Certified Training Institution Bureau of Automotive Repair . We passed the inspection on all counts.  Many schools do not pass all 42 inspections on their first attempt.  Our equipment demonstrated to be operational and in great shape.  This ensures that our students will have the best quality equipment to learn on.  We take great care to make sure our students receive the best education possible by keeping our standards high and our equipment in working order.

Click the link below to see all 42 items we passed

BAR Audit

IPS Recruiter Presentation

IPS presentation

A Recruiter from IPS is coming out to Twentynine Palms on Februay 26, 2014.

Anyone interested in attending this presentation contact our admissions department, even if you do not have your CDL. IPS has hired people before completion of the program and we can help assist you in obtaining your license. We have worked with IPS for many years and have had many graduates work with them.

 

Student to the Rescue!

During training, a coolant filter ruptured on one our vehicles leaving our students and instructor in the Barstow desert. We called our regular towing and repair company and they said, “[We] can’t get one till the next day.”

“We’re out in the desert,” and, “running out of options.” To top it all off, it was a hot day in July. “I would have had to gotten a tow,” said Pat. So he decided to call recent graduate and soldier Levi Busch. “He just lived five minutes away from where we broke down.”

“I got a call from Pat,” said Levi, “They were stranded by Yermo… grabbed my tools and went out.” Levi drove Pat down to a store on the other side of town and found the filter in question. Levi had the right set of tools and the problem was taken care of in a quick minute. “It’s no problem, I wanted to get the truck working… It’s taking time from the students too.” In a nutshell, he said, “Anytime for Pat!” The vehicle was back in running order and students went on to train with Pat once again.

Pat told us that Levi received the highest DMV score among his classmates during his testing day. We want to share our appreciation with Levi for coming out to help us when our students and our instructor were running out of options. Once again, thanks Levi!

Homeland Security Grad

Walter David Hinds, athlete and hunter, came to California Career School back in October last year. He has a son in Afghanistan and is a graduate of various weapons and training schools.

We asked him, why choose a vocational school? “Honestly,” David expressed, “I needed the permits.” He talked about his weapons training, being an edge weapon instructor, avidly participating in jujitsu and all kinds of other activities. Yet, application after application, employers would press him, “Where’s your permit for pepperspray?” or “Where’s your permit for baton training?” Some employers told him that his concealed carry weapons permit was not valid for the job—that he needed a regular firearms carry permit. That’s how David Hinds stopped by our front door here at California Career School. He earned his firearms permit, pepperspray training permit, baton permit, first aid/CPR permit, and finally his guard card.

“Right now, I’m headed to the gym,” he joked. “Right now, I’m focusing on one job,” David referred to Social Security or any Veteran’s building. “I’ll apply to other different places. I’m a protective agent,” he explained, “that’s what I enjoy.”

So we went on to talk about firearms. He described to me a situation some time ago when he was approached by some individuals out in Moreno Valley and was shot twice in the chest during a robbery. “There’s dangers, so you have to be careful. Good things happen from [guns]—bad things happen from [guns].” When the robbery occurred, he thought, “I didn’t really think anything would ever happen to me.” David expressed that, no matter how prepared you feel to be, there are always threats.

Fast forward to today, after his completion of the Homeland Security and Investigations Course. He talked about the importance of keeping face as a security officer and to use the mind before resorting to force. He said, “Always got to keep sharp. You have to balance it out. You don’t want to be hurting someone for no reason.” Over the course of training, Roland, our course instructor, helped David refine a number of things, one being trigger reset while handling firearms. Another more personal type of focus was David’s left eye dominance, which he had previously been unaware of. Adjustments in firearm grip and technique needed to be made because of this.

“I knew where my strengths and weaknesses [were],” he described. “Roland helped turn my weaknesses into strengths… There’s always room for improvement. I definitely feel improved.”

Refer-a-Friend

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We have had so many great success stories and we just want to keep them coming. Many people have started a new career path and gone to amazing companies and seen a lot of interesting places. Here at CCS we just want to say thank you for making our experience enjoyable. So now it is time to return thefavor. Earn extra income for helping a friend find a career.

 

Tell your friends about our program!

Spread the word; share with them your success story!

Earn referral rewards when you refer your friends to sign up!

 

When One Door Closes, Many Open

Returning from a flight from Chicago, our Homeland Security and Investigations graduate, Kirk Wahrman decided to drop by and say hello. We had lost touch with him for a while since he was in the process of applying for a health and safety supervisory position on the other side of the US.
Before coming to California Career School, Mr. Wahrman was in the health and safety industry working happily and enjoying his duties. However, an unexpected discovery with his own health had forced him out of the job—he was diagnosed with cancer. After several months of testing and various visits to hospitals, he returned to his work place only to find that he was relieved of his position.

This devastating news forced him to turn to the Employment Development Department (EDD) for the next step. “They kept telling me,” Kirk recalled, “You have good experience but you don’t have a degree.” Having been in the industry for years, Kirk’s experience level was high but a school background was lacking. After more dead ends and little progress in his search, Kirk changed his focus and decided to look into the security field. From 1975 to about 1995, Mr. Wahrman served in the Navy . “I was in security many years ago. Getting back into the business, being post 9/11, I knew there were going to be many changes,” he expressed.

“And that’s how I found California Career School,” Kirk said. Various aspects of security needed to be looked at in very different ways than what had been done in the past. “Roland,” said Kirk, “was very supportive and flexible, very knowledgeable, very thorough, generally takes an interest in the students and wants to see them succeed.” Roland Esquivel is our course instructor for the Homeland Security and Investigations course.

We asked Kirk about his favorite part of the course. “Graduation day,” he exclaimed, “with all the food and festivities. No, I’m just teasing. But the sense of accomplishment was there, that I completed a huge 500 hours of training.”

“We studied a lot of real life security issues, things in the news, things that were current.” Students would read these articles and the class would break them down into what laws were applied in those given situations, what procedures were taken, correct and incorrect actions taken towards a suspect, and other types of observations. “It really helped me learn the right way to look at a situation and be a better security officer.”

“Once I finished California Career School, I was considered for higher than entry level positions.” His military background played a huge part in that. Since then, the California Career School placement office has helped Kirk obtain offers from Securitas and Allied Barton. Kirk worked for both of these companies but as of this writing, he will hopefully be returning to Chicago to pursue an opportunity that he recently found in the industry he was originally in: health and safety.

We hope that Kirk will make it into this job as it is the one that he was originally looking for before reaching out to California Career School. It is indeed in his own health and his own safety that we wish him well. We would like to thank Mr. Kirk Wahrman for repeatedly taking the time to come in to visit with big smiles and always something funny to share.

“He’s got a lot of talent—he was a great student,” said Roland, our instructor. “[He] had a lot of fun experiences to share with the class, made the class more interesting… he had a great sense of humor, he will do great at whatever he puts his mind to.”