CCS Athlete and Hunter


Walter David Hinds, athlete and hunter, came to California Career School back in October last year. He has a son in Afghanistan and is a graduate of various weapons and training schools.

We asked him, why choose a vocational school? “Honestly,” David expressed, “I needed the permits.” He talked about his weapons training, being an edge weapon instructor, avidly participating in jujitsu and all kinds of other activities. Yet, application after application, employers would press him, “Where’s your permit for pepperspray?” or “Where’s your permit for baton training?” Some employers told him that his concealed carry weapons permit was not valid for the job—that he needed a regular firearms carry permit. That’s how David Hinds stopped by our front door here at California Career School. He earned his firearms permit, pepperspray training permit, baton permit, first aid/CPR permit, and finally his guard card.

“Right now, I’m headed to the gym,” he joked. “Right now, I’m focusing on one job,” David referred to Social Security or any Veteran’s building. “I’ll apply to other different places. I’m a protective agent,” he explained, “that’s what I enjoy.”

So we went on to talk about firearms. He described to me a situation some time ago when he was approached by some individuals out in Moreno Valley and was shot twice in the chest during a robbery. “There’s dangers, so you have to be careful. Good things happen from [guns]—bad things happen from [guns].” When the robbery occurred, he thought, “I didn’t really think anything would ever happen to me.” David expressed that, no matter how prepared you feel to be, there are always threats.

Fast forward to today, after his completion of the Homeland Security and Investigations Course. He talked about the importance of keeping face as a security officer and to use the mind before resorting to force. He said, “Always got to keep sharp. You have to balance it out. You don’t want to be hurting someone for no reason.” Over the course of training, Roland, our course instructor, helped David refine a number of things, one being trigger reset while handling firearms. Another more personal type of focus was David’s left eye dominance, which he had previously been unaware of. Adjustments in firearm grip and technique needed to be made because of this.

“I knew where my strengths and weaknesses [were],” he described. “Roland helped turn my weaknesses into strengths… There’s always room for improvement. I definitely feel improved.”